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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Statoil News

Helge Lund assumed the role as President and CEO of Statoil on 16 August 2004.

Statoil’s President & CEO Helge Lund Resigns

Statoil President and CEO Helge Lund has informed the company's board of directors that he will resign. Helge Lund has chosen to leave Statoil to take up the position as CEO of another international oil and gas company. The board of directors has appointed Eldar Sætre as acting president and CEO of Statoil with immediate effect. According to a Reuters report, Statoil's long-serving chief executive will take on the top role at smaller rival BG, where he has been promised a big pay rise if he can turn round the flagging British gas and oil producer. "I would like to thank Helge Lund for

John Knight (Photo: Trond Isaksen / Statoil)

Statoil's Strategy Chief Knight to Leave Oil Firm in 2019

John Knight, Statoil's head of global strategy and business development, will leave the Norwegian oil firm in 2019, Statoil said in its annual report on Friday.   Knight, a British citizen who has been working at Statoil since 2002, has been a key figure in the international expansion of the Norwegian state-controlled firm in recent years.   "Based on a mutual understanding, John Knight, employed by Statoil UK, will end his employment with the company as of 1 January 2019," said the report.     (Reporting by Gwladys Fouche, editing by Terje Solsvik)

Anders Opedal

Statoil Appoints COO

  Anders Opedal is appointed executive vice president and takes on a new position as chief operating officer (COO) in the corporate executive committee (CEC) of Statoil as of 1 April. Opedal will be responsible the corporate improvement programmes and for driving operational efficiency across Statoils business areas. “I am pleased to announce that Anders assumes this new position in the CEC. He will be a driving force in our effort to further improve the safety and efficiency of our operations. I really look forward to his contribution to develop a highly profitable, competitive and

Statoil Moves Key IT Tasks from India Back to Norway

Statoil said on Friday it would move its critical information technology (IT) tasks from Indian provider HCL Technologies back to Norway to improve security. A number of IT-related security incidents in recent years, including one that disrupted oil loading at the Mongstad refinery in 2014, had led the Norwegian energy company to create a task force to assess risks. As a result of this assessment Statoil decided to strip its most "critical" tasks from provider HCL, to which the company outsources most of its infrastructure IT management, after internal reports identified potential

CEO Eldar Sætre

Statoil Appoints CFO, 3 EVPs and Rejigs Top Deck

  Statoil appoints new chief financial officer (CFO), and launches business area for New Energy Solutions (NES). Three new executive vice presidents (EVPs) are appointed as members of the corporate executive committee (CEC). CFO Torgrim Reitan is appointed EVP for Development & Production USA (DPUSA) after Bill Maloney decided to not prolong his contract with Statoil. Hans Jakob Hegge is appointed new EVP and CFO. Hegge comes from the position as senior vice president for Operations North in Development & Production Norway. Irene Rummelhoff is appointed EVP for New Energy Solutions

Eldar Sætre, new Statoil president and CEO. (Photo Harald Pettersen)

Sætre Appointed President & CEO of Statoil

Statoil’s board of directors has appointed Eldar Sætre as the company’s new president and CEO.   Sætre, who has 35 years’ experience from Statoil and the oil and gas industry, has been acting as president and CEO since October, and assumes the role with immediate effect.   "Eldar Sætre was our first choice. The industry and company are facing demanding challenges. Eldar stands out with his long experience and ability to create change. Those are qualities we need in times like these. I am extra pleased that we were able to recruit the next CEO from

Statoil Could Cut Workforce by 2,000

Norwegian energy firm Statoil could lay off another 2,000 employees by the end of 2016, business daily Dagens Naeringsliv (DN) said on Friday.   The decision will be finalised in the near future, after discussions with the management and representatives from the unions on Thursday.   According to DN, 1,500 employees will be laid off, as well as 500 hired workers.   The cuts would be part of Statoil's technical efficiency programme announced in February, which targets a $1.7 billion annual cost reduction.   A Statoil spokesman told Reuters that there was no basis to comment

Anders Opedal, executive vice president and chief operating officer in Statoil. (Photo Harald Pettersen)

Estimating Further Workforce Reductions at Statoil

  The effort to standardise, simplify and increase efficiency across Statoil enters the next phase. The potential workforce reduction is estimated at 1,100 – 1,500 permanent employees by end 2016. In addition Statoil will further reduce the number of consultants by around 525. The estimate for workforce reductions reflects the STEP efficiency potential and further corporate improvements over the coming 18 months. "We regret the need for further reductions, but the improvements are necessary to strengthen Statoil’s competitiveness and secure our future value creation

Statoil Nominates Agerup on Board

  The nomination committee in Statoil recommends that the company's corporate assembly elects Wenche Agerup as a new member of Statoil's board of directors. The nomination committee in Statoil recommends that Wenche Agerup is elected as new member of the board. Catherine Hughes withdrew from the Statoil board with effect from 19 April 2015. The nomination committee’s search for a new, female board member as a replacement for Hughes is now finalised, and the nomination committee proposes that a supplementary election to the board is held in the corporate assembly meeting 20 August 2015.

Image courtesy of Statoil

Subsea: Standardization is the New Innovation

Oslo, Norway – May 19, 2014 – As one of the world’s most technologically innovative industries, the highly specialized subsea sector is not typically known for standardized operations. But that might change.   Companies like Statoil, the world’s second largest subsea operator, have traditionally achieved success by pushing the boundaries to what is possible under water, frequently going “longer, deeper and colder.”    But as the complexity of global subsea projects grows, so too does the bill for contractors, suppliers, operators, engineers

Photo courtesy of Semco Maritime

Semco Signs Staffing Agreement with Statoil

Semco Maritime Norway informs it has been awarded a new framework agreement for supply of temporary staffing to Statoil ASA. The agreement applies to several types of specialists, both onshore and offshore, at Statoil’s installations and onshore facilities. The framework agreement runs for four years and holds options for additional four years.

From right to left – OSM crew members Giliard Damasceno Miranda (Deck Operator), Wilton Pereira Gomes (Deck Operator) and Alex Fabiano de Figueiredo Oliveira paying attention to the instructions that Bruno Araujo (back) is going through (Photo: OSM)

OSM Officially On Board Statoil’s Peregrino

with more than 90 specialized offshore positions officially on board the Peregrino.   “OSM Brazil have successfully mobilized our crew on board the FPSO Peregrino,” says Tommy Olofsen, Managing Director of OSM Crew Management.  OSM Maritime Group (OSM) began its journey with Statoil’s Floating Production Storage Unit (FPSO) Peregrino back in early 2016.   However, increased efforts and investments in Brazil have been ongoing since 2013 – with multiple office locations, and an EBN Certification that marks the company as a registered Brazilian Shipping Company

The work will be managed by Aker Solutions' UK MMO unit through an integrated construction and completions (ICC) organization with Daewoo and Statoil.

Aker Solutions Wins Mariner Development Deal

to provide engineering, construction and commissioning services for the hook-up phase of the Mariner oilfield development in the UK North Sea. The agreement is worth more than GBP 120 million. It comes in addition to a five-year maintenance and modifications services contract awarded in June by Statoil for the Mariner field, which is set to start production in 2017. "We are very pleased to be expanding our already significant role in developing the Mariner field and to be working with Daewoo and Statoil," said Tore Sjursen, head of Aker Solutions' maintenance, modifications and operations

Gunnar Breivik, managing director, Statoil Production (U.K.) Limited

Statoil Awards Mariner Contracts to UK Suppliers

  Statoil (U.K.) Limited has awarded the maintenance and modification services contract for the Mariner field to Aker Solutions UK.  The offshore services contract has been awarded to Stork Technical Services Limited, also based in the UK. Aker Solutions will perform the services for the Mariner field under a five-year contract, anticipated to start in August this year. Stork will commence services in January 2015, also under a five-year term. Both contracts include two 2-year extension options.  The Mariner platform is currently under construction and production is scheduled to

Snorre B - Photo Harald Pettersen - Statoil.jpg

"Soil Shift" Shuts Down Statoil Snorre B Platform

Statoil shut oil production at its Snorre B platform in the North Sea and evacuated a quarter of the personnel there after detecting a soil shift under a drilling template and then oil leak, the company said on Monday. The Snorre field in the northern part of the North Sea is Norway's fourth-biggest oil producer with output averaging 88,000 barrels of oil per day in 2013, data from Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) showed. The field has two production platforms but Statoil declined to provide a breakdown between Snorre B and Snorre A, which is operating normally. Production at Snorre B

Home: http://www.npd.no/en/Publications/Facts/Facts-2012/Preface1/

Offshore O&G: Cuts, Delays in Norway as Costs Soar

infrastructure, Nyland told Reuters. Oil firms are cutting back on capital spending across the world as years of cost inflation has squeezed margins, cutting back their ability to pay dividends. Norway, where the per unit cost has increased 10-fold in 10 years has already fallen victim to cuts. Statoil earlier this year sharply reduced its investment budget while Shell this month called off a multi-billion dollar project to increase recovery at its Ormen Lange gas field. Statoil's $15.5 billion Johan Castberg find in the Arctic, put on hold last year because of high costs, is also hanging in

North Sea – Hope for Declining Production?

; therefore, DW expect a resumption of decline towards the end of the decade. Hope for any long-term growth rests with much-needed reform of the UK’s offshore regulator, which must swiftly adapt to the shift towards production from smaller fields.   On the other side of the North Sea, Statoil are to attempt improved recovery from brownfield projects offshore Norway. Along with the start of projects in the large Johan Sverdrup and Goliat fields, this will see the number of well completions sustained at around 200 a year beyond 2020. DW expect these projects will see Norway break from

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